[Folk Books/folk Art][Photography][Citizen Kane] Album of Photographs Depicting Screen Shots of Citizen Kane As it Appeared in Theaters around 1942. Warren John Harder, Orson Welles.
[Folk Books/folk Art][Photography][Citizen Kane] Album of Photographs Depicting Screen Shots of Citizen Kane As it Appeared in Theaters around 1942.
[Folk Books/folk Art][Photography][Citizen Kane] Album of Photographs Depicting Screen Shots of Citizen Kane As it Appeared in Theaters around 1942.
[Folk Books/folk Art][Photography][Citizen Kane] Album of Photographs Depicting Screen Shots of Citizen Kane As it Appeared in Theaters around 1942.
[Folk Books/folk Art][Photography][Citizen Kane] Album of Photographs Depicting Screen Shots of Citizen Kane As it Appeared in Theaters around 1942.

[Folk Books/folk Art][Photography][Citizen Kane] Album of Photographs Depicting Screen Shots of Citizen Kane As it Appeared in Theaters around 1942.

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Item #2094

1942 (photographs) and 1965 (album compilation). 11” x 18½”. Screw bound brown cloth over boards. 28 pages with 79 black and white photographs adhesive mounted. Most photos measure 3½” x 4½” and are captioned on adhered small sheets of typescript. Fine save for a couple of small punctures to front board. “An abridged version of of one of the greatest motion pictures ever produced, ” is how the compiler of this album describes his creation. Warren Harder was a news reporter and commercial photographer who fell in love with “Citizen Kane” when it first appeared in theaters. According to his introductory typescript, the photos were taken in 1942 in theaters in Harrisburg. He was compelled to make the album by the opportunity to watch it on television in 1965. This is his attempt at recreating the experience of the movie through photographs of the film itself, combined with his captions. Page by page, the album unfolds the story from the movie, beginning with shots of the production and title screens. The captions are rich with detail such as “in the dimly lighted room can be seen a hand of the dying man holding a small glass ball containing a snow covered house. As he hoarsely whispers his last word, 'Rosebud,' it rolls from his hand and breaks on the floor. The body is covered and the scene fades. ” Harder also recorded the sound from the television broadcast and transcribed portions of the audio for his captions. A carefully and cleverly created homage to a favorite film. This item is offered by Langdon Manor Books, LLC, antiquarian booksellers. Please do not hesitate to contact us for additional information and/or photos and we will respond promptly. We package our items carefully, ship daily, and have a no hassle returns policy--your satisfaction is guaranteed. We are members of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA) , the International League of Antiquarian Booksllers (ILAB) and the Independent Online Booksellers Association (IOBA) and adhere to their rules of ethics.

Price: $750.00