[African Americana][Militaria][Interracial Couples] Photo Album Depicting African American Soldier and His German Wife.
[African Americana][Militaria][Interracial Couples] Photo Album Depicting African American Soldier and His German Wife.
[African Americana][Militaria][Interracial Couples] Photo Album Depicting African American Soldier and His German Wife.
[African Americana][Militaria][Interracial Couples] Photo Album Depicting African American Soldier and His German Wife.
[African Americana][Militaria][Interracial Couples] Photo Album Depicting African American Soldier and His German Wife.

[African Americana][Militaria][Interracial Couples] Photo Album Depicting African American Soldier and His German Wife.

Germany And California: Mostly1962-1967. Item #1287

10¾” x 15½”. String tied full leather over boards. 34 pages with 88 black and white and 66 color photos inserted into corner mounts; an additional 19 photos and several items of ephemera laid in. Most photos measure from 2½” x 3¼” to 5¾” x 4” and many are captioned. Album very good plus with a couple of small losses; photos generally near fine or better, 31 appear to be lacking but may be among the ones laid in. This album documents the early years of a half-century long love affair between African American soldier Winton Turner and his German wife, Ilse. They met in 1962 and were married in 1964. Winton adopted Ilse's son, Karl, as well. The album starts in Germany, soon after they met, showing them at Ilse's company party. There are several wedding photos, shots of their life around their home, and several trips including stops in Taunus and Frankfurt. Sometime around 1966 they moved to Alameda, California and images here show their first house in the U. S. , trips to Santa Cruz and Big Sur, a barbecue, a Christmas celebration and more. The ephemera include 1965 German news clippings featuring Winton. One is an interview of him with the headline, “Violent Acts Cannot Solve the Racial Problem”. Two deeply personal letters from Ilse to Winton are also included. Ilse either had a miscarriage or lost a child at birth that they'd named “Baley” in March, 1964. One of the letters to Winton reads, “I was so happy being pregnant, and I also watched your happyness about being a father soon. And now we just hurt like this—forgive me my Dear. But when I am well again I go to a good Doctor and find out, when I am strong enough, to have another Baley. ” They suffered a similar fate just eight months later, with another letter from Ilse in November reading, “Again we did loose our little child . . . I am sorry my love, for disappointing you again . . . How deep hurt must be in your heart . . . Please Winton, love us always like you did before, even if cannot have any Baley's anymore. ” Winton granted Ilse's request as they stayed married for nearly 50 years, dying within one month of each other in 2013. They also had a daughter together, Soo. This item is offered by Langdon Manor Books, LLC, antiquarian booksellers. Please do not hesitate to contact us for additional information and/or photos and we will respond promptly. We package our items carefully, ship daily, and have a no hassle returns policy--your satisfaction is guaranteed. We are members of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA) , the International League of Antiquarian Booksllers (ILAB) and the Independent Online Booksellers Association (IOBA) and adhere to their rules of ethics.

Price: $1,000.00