[Women][Nursing][Spanish-American War][Native Americans]photo Album Likely Compiled by an American Nurse Serving in the Spanish-American War.
[Women][Nursing][Spanish-American War][Native Americans]photo Album Likely Compiled by an American Nurse Serving in the Spanish-American War.
[Women][Nursing][Spanish-American War][Native Americans]photo Album Likely Compiled by an American Nurse Serving in the Spanish-American War.
[Women][Nursing][Spanish-American War][Native Americans]photo Album Likely Compiled by an American Nurse Serving in the Spanish-American War.
[Women][Nursing][Spanish-American War][Native Americans]photo Album Likely Compiled by an American Nurse Serving in the Spanish-American War.
[Women][Nursing][Spanish-American War][Native Americans]photo Album Likely Compiled by an American Nurse Serving in the Spanish-American War.

[Women][Nursing][Spanish-American War][Native Americans]photo Album Likely Compiled by an American Nurse Serving in the Spanish-American War.

Item #1521

Various: 1898-1899. 7¼” x 11¼”. Screw bound, quarter leather over pebbled cloth, spine and joints inartfully strengthened with cloth tape; thick card leaves. 40 pages with 108 black and white photographs and six images clipped from magazines all adhesive mounted. Most photos measure around 3 5/8” x 4 3/4” and most are captioned; six are commercially produced real photos. Album good: heavy edge wear with loss at corners; spine and joints strengthened with cloth tape; approximately three quarters of the photos are very good or better, the rest are good with varying degrees of exposure issues and/or surface scuffs and all but a few of these have discernible, if not crisp, images. American female nurses served in the Spanish-American War to fill the shortage created by the lack of male nurses. While Congress would not allow women to join the military, it authorized the hiring of female nurses as contractors, and Dr. Anita Newcomb McGee headed the recruitment drive in conjunction with the Daughters of the American Revolution. They called it the “D. A. R. Hospital Corps. ” By the end of August 1898, the Army Nurse Corps was established as part of the Surgeon General's office. Approximately 1560 nurses served, and 153 died—all from disease. Later, McGee wrote the section on nursing for the Army Reorganization Act which Congress passed in 1901, officially establishing the Army Nurse Corps as part of the military. This album shows nurses at Camp Cuba Libre near Jacksonville, Florida and Camp Onward in Savannah, Georgia. There are also photos of the cities themselves as well as some images of Havana. We believe this album was created by one of those nurses, with at least 25 photos showing women. Several captions distinctly point to one of the women we see in the photos as the album's compiler including one at Camp Onward where we see the women with their luggage outside of tents with the caption, “without a home/as we landed at Camp Onward. ” There are approximately 40 photos of camps Cuba Libre and Onward. In addition to the photos of nurses and other medical personnel, there are photos of a guard house, the post office, a group shot of men with rakes, soldiers dining, and a patient being carried to a hospital train. We also see the disinfecting tent, soldiers cooking and a few photos show the women leaving Camp Cuba Libre in a military carriage. Of particular note is an image of the four Native American nuns who served. These four women, Susan Bordeaux (the Reverend Mother M. Anthony) , Ella Clark (the Reverend Sister M. Gertrude) , Anna B. Pleets (the Reverend Mother M. Bridget) , and Josephine Two Bears (the Reverend Sister M. Joseph) came from the Congregation of American Sisters of Fort Pierre, South Dakota. Although they had no formal medical training, they had three years experience learning to treat patients in homes and hospitals near Fort Pierre. While they first served at Camp Cuba Libre, they were soon transferred to Havana where Susan Bordeaux died of complications related to tuberculosis. All four were awarded the Cross of the Order of Spanish-American War Nurses for bravery and heroism in the hospital and on the field. We are aware of only one other extant image of these women. In addition to the camp images, there are a number of outstanding street scenes of Jacksonville and a few of Savannah. There are also several vernacular, and six commercial, images of Cuba as well as a shot of the hospital ship, Missouri, on its way to Cuba. Only around 76 of the women who served ended up in Cuba but we'll leave it up to future scholars to argue if our compiler served in Cuba. OCLC reveals minimal holdings for images of camps Cuba Libre and Onward as well as Spanish-American War nurses. We find nothing in the auction records or presently in the trade regarding images of female nurses in the Spanish-American War. Rare and compelling imagery documenting a critical moment in the history of women in the United States military. This item is offered by Langdon Manor Books, LLC, antiquarian booksellers. Please do not hesitate to contact us for additional information and/or photos and we will respond promptly. We package our items carefully, ship daily, and have a no hassle returns policy--your satisfaction is guaranteed. We are members of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA) , the International League of Antiquarian Booksllers (ILAB) and the Independent Online Booksellers Association (IOBA) and adhere to their rules of ethics.

Price: $4,500.00