[Protests][Apartheid] Photographs of Protests by the Johns Hopkins Coalition for a Free South Africa. Jose Joaquin Ivey.
[Protests][Apartheid] Photographs of Protests by the Johns Hopkins Coalition for a Free South Africa.
[Protests][Apartheid] Photographs of Protests by the Johns Hopkins Coalition for a Free South Africa.

[Protests][Apartheid] Photographs of Protests by the Johns Hopkins Coalition for a Free South Africa.

Baltimore, Maryland: 1986. Very Good. Item #934

11 black and white photographs mounted on heavy cards measuring 14” x 11” + handwritten title card in black felt marker. Photos are 6½” x 9 3/8” or the reverse. Mounts very good plus or better, photos near fine or better. The Johns Hopkins Coalition For A Free South Africa built shanties on university grounds to protest the school's investments in South Africa. Shanties had been built at college campuses nationwide to symbolize living conditions of black South Africans. The protests often led to confrontations with right-wing student groups. Members of the Johns Hopkins group occupied the shanties around the clock. In May, 1986, three members of Delta Upsilon fraternity set fire to one of the shanties, causing first and second degree burns to a student inside and they were charged with attempted murder. The arson caused the press to take greater notice and created much more support for the protesters. The university responded by tracking some of the protesters, creating files on them, and ultimately issuing a decree that banned unauthorized school structures. Protesters ignored the decree, which caused 14 of them to be arrested in September. In October, the board of trustees voted for selective divestment, causing the protesters (who wanted full divestment) to occupy the administration building on October 26, 1986, slinging a huge banner to rename the building “Mandela Hall” . This collection of photos by an African American student at Hopkins, Jose Ivey, includes a shot of the students occupying the administration building, protesting on the steps of buildings, and one of faculty members forced to step over students whose bodies filled a hallway. One terrific image depicts a white protester interviewed by the media, while just to his left his black comrade wearing a large homemade placard belts into a microphone. Another shows a protester dragged by police, his or her camera dangling from an arm, a great shot made extraordinary when we learned from the photographer that as the student fell to the ground, the strap wrapped around the officer's gun. The officer started screaming, saying the student was going for his gun, when a calmer officer walked up and unhooked the camera strap. Jose Ivey studied photography at the Maryland Institute College of Art while getting his B. A. At Johns Hopkins where he graduated in 1987. He was also the photographer for the 2009 book A Young Dancer: The Life of an Ailey Student. He tells us there was a show and (impossible to find) catalog of his riot aftermath pictures in Los Angeles and his photo from this series, “Fuck the Police” (not included here) , is published in Deepak Sawhney's Unmasking L. A. (New York: Palgrave, 2002) , where it's described as “[fulfilling] the highest obligations of resistance art by encouraging audience reflection on deeper social inequities”. An outstanding collection from a talented black photographer. This item is offered by Langdon Manor Books, LLC, antiquarian booksellers. Please do not hesitate to contact us for additional information and/or photos and we will respond promptly. We package our items carefully, ship daily, and have a no hassle returns policy--your satisfaction is guaranteed. We are members of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA) , the International League of Antiquarian Booksllers (ILAB) and the Independent Online Booksellers Association (IOBA) and adhere to their rules of ethics.

Price: $750.00